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Wednesday Buzz: Win Over Gen Z With VR

By / Jun 28, 2017 (HammerAndTusk/Pixabay)

VR technology may help your organization connect with Gen Z. Also: A common piece of career advice may actually be hurting women.

Do you have plans to win over Gen Z? They’re breathing down the necks of millennials, and associations need to think strategically about how to recruit this next generation, which is just beginning to enter the workforce.

A recent post from Inc. says virtual reality tech might be a way to wow Gen Zers, in part because they are the first true digital natives (the article defines Gen Z as those born between 1998 and 2008). And they’re likely to be culturally and socially aware—encouraging news for associations. “For a nonprofit organization or a company that leads through corporate philanthropy, virtual reality can put Gen Zers directly inside the environments they are most passionate about, from a remote village in a Third World country to a bee farm in Vermont,” writes Kate L. Harrison.

Your annual meetings are a great opportunity to showcase immersive VR content about your association’s work. Not only will VR help you tell a compelling story, but it also will deliver a memorable experience that can deepen the connection between your organization and these young professionals.

Salary Negotiations

https://twitter.com/StevenEchard/status/880076291252248578

You may have heard this little piece of career advice: During a job interview, don’t tell a prospective employer what you make in your current job. The idea is that you don’t want your new salary to be undercut just because you were underpaid at your last position. Sounds like good advice, right?

The tip does appear to help men, but research shows it can actually hurt women. “When job applicants are asked about their current salaries, women get penalized for demurring, while men benefit, according to a survey from PayScale Inc., a salary comparison website,” writes Bloomberg’s Rebecca Greenfield.

In the Payscale survey, women who didn’t disclose their salary received offers that were 1.8 percent lower than women who did disclose. Men who stayed quiet got offers that were higher than men who told.

Other Links of Note

Have you checked Google News today? Google revamped the desktop version of the site to offer diverse perspectives and to make it easier to navigate.

Snapchat just made custom geofilters easier to use. The platform now allows you to create and submit custom filters in the app, reports TechCrunch.

Speaking of apps … Fast Company reveals eight apps to help you become a better public speaker.

Raegan Johnson

Raegan Johnson is a contributor to Associations Now. More »

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