Leadership

Lunchtime Links: How Your Boss' Children Can Affect Your Salary

By / Jan 7, 2013 (Hemera/Thinkstock)

A new study from the American Economic Association notes that employee salaries fluctuate depending on the gender of their chief executive’s firstborn. Also: One blogger’s message to the 113th Congress.

If you’re CEO is expecting his firstborn child, you better hope he has a daughter. (This sounds random, but trust us.)

Find out why in today’s Lunchtime Links:

On day one, every member will be given a dictionary and asked to learn the word compromise. Learn to spell it. Learn to pronounce it. Learn to appreciate it. There will be a quiz.

It’s a girl! (If you’re lucky.): New research revealed during the American Economic Association’s annual meeting last week suggests that male CEOs with daughters pay their workers more than those with sons. According to their study, if a CEO’s wife gives birth to a son, his workers’ yearly salaries go down by about $100. However, after a CEO’s first daughter is born, employee wages rise by 1.1 percent for female employees and 0.6 percent for male employees. Check out more data points from the study in this Wall Street Journal story.

Hear this, Congress: With the 113th Congress moving in, now seems like a good time to reflect — just ask Stefanie Reeves, senior legislative and federal affairs officer at the American Psychological Association. On her Association Advocacy Chick blog, Reeves offers advice to the 95 new members of Congress, including this hard-to-misread point: “On day one, every member will be given a dictionary and asked to learn the word compromise. Learn to spell it. Learn to pronounce it. Learn to appreciate it. There will be a quiz.” The 112th may have been the most unproductive Congress ever, but that doesn’t mean the 113th has to follow in its footsteps.

Making the most of Evernote: Premier note-taking app Evernote received some much-deserved hype in 2012. From the meeting room to event planning, the free service has become an essential tool for business leaders. If you’ve never used it before (or want to use it more), the Harvard Business Review’s Alexandra Samuel offers a month-to-month regime in her post “Work Smarter with Evernote in 2013.

Keep your association in the conversation: The new president of the American Historical Association, Kenneth Pomeranz, knows historians have big stories to share, and if they don’t tell them, the industry may lose its place as a part of the bigger cultural conversation. “If we’re too shy to tell those large stories—if we say everything is so complex, I don’t ever want to generalize—other people, ranging from certain kinds of political scientists and economists and so on to evening-news pundits, will rush in and fill the gap, as they have,” he said in a Q&A published in The Chronicle of Higher Education. How have you kept your association’s voice in the mix?

What cool stuff have you been reading today? Let us know in the comments.

Anita Ferrer

Anita Ferrer is a contributor to Associations Now. More »

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