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Social Media Roundup: Don't Control Your Speakers; Let Them Speak

By / Jun 11, 2013 (iStockphoto/Thinkstock)

Trying to control every aspect of your speakers’ presentations can be a clear sign of distrust. Also: How some companies are using Vine for their clients.

You’ve hired a speaker for your event, so let them do what they do best: Speak.

Give your speakers the trust they deserve, and more, in today’s Social Media Roundup.

Don’t Speak Up

Silence is sometimes the answer. Many event professionals make the mistake of hiring speakers for their event, and then proceed to micromanage what they present, even monitoring the words they say. In his article, “Dear Event Planner, I Hate You. Sincerely, Your Speaker,” Julius Solaris says, “Not trusting the speaker’s content means not trusting the speaker. Stop doing that.” If you’ve hired a good speaker, they should have a sound portfolio of their work, which is most likely why you hired them to speak at your event. Don’t control your speakers’ output. Instead, trust the professionals and let them do their job.  (ht @tojulius)

Strategize With Vine

Instead of creating videos, create strategy. For those who couldn’t attend the New York International Auto Show earlier this year, Vine was their behind-the-scenes access. Situation Interactive, the digital marketing agency for the show, relied on the video-sharing tool to boost awareness of the show and to try out new marketing strategies. According to BizBash, the agency had people follow Twitter and Facebook to find out what the audience wanted to see from the show. Then two team members would make these requests a reality using Vine. The result? Videos that have reached millions of viewers. “Vine is perfect for the social Web where everything is so fast and fleeting and you want something quick to grab someone’s attention,” Creative Strategy Supervisor Angie Gannon told the publication. (ht @EliIngino

Does your organization include Vine in its social media strategy? Share your thoughts in the comments.

Jasmine McGee

Jasmine McGee is a contributor to Associations Now. More »

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