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Lung Association Takes Broader View With Latest Report

The American Lung Association’s inaugural “State of Lung Cancer” report, created as part of its LUNG FORCE initiative, notes that individual states vary greatly when it comes to diagnoses of lung cancer.

The American Lung Association is taking a new approach to informing the public of the impact of lung cancer.

For the first time, ALA is combining state and national lung cancer statistics into a new report titled “State of Lung Cancer,” done under the purview of its LUNG FORCE initiative, which focuses on the lung cancer risks women face.

The report notes that the incidence of lung cancer—more than 234,000 new cases are expected to be diagnosed this year—varies greatly, with residents of Kentucky most likely to suffer from the disease and residents of Utah least likely. While smoking (including secondhand smoke) is generally considered a major cause of the disease, the report cites radon gas and air pollution as other key causes.

The report makes the case for prevention and different kinds of treatment options, including smoking cessation and awareness of any familial issues that might put you at greater risk of getting the disease. The goal of the report, says ALA National President and CEO Harold P. Wimmer, is to boost awareness at the state level—with the report serving as a baseline for future action.

“Nationally, the five-year survival rate for lung cancer is 18.1 percent—meaning four out of five people diagnosed will not survive longer than five years,” Wimmer said in a news release. “More must be done to save lives, and this new report serves as a powerful tool for identifying both needs and opportunities in every state to turn the tide against lung cancer.”

The new report is tied to LUNG FORCE’s annual advocacy day, which will take place on Capitol Hill on March 14.

Want to see how your state did overall? Check the ALA website.

(KLH49/E+/Getty Images Plus)

Ernie Smith

By Ernie Smith

Ernie Smith is the social media journalist for Associations Now, a former newspaper guy, and a man who is dangerous when armed with a good pun. MORE

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