Money & Business

Friday Buzz: What Skills Will the Future Workforce Need?

By / Mar 31, 2017 (iStock/Thinkstock)

Will the future workforce be dominated by generalists, specialists, or something in between? Also: Twitter makes a change to replies.

The workplace landscape is changing in ways that are both predictable and unexpected. Different skills and experiences are needed to keep pace with change and to innovate organizations.

In that vein, Inc. contributing author Jacob Morgan asks whether it will be better to be a generalist or a specialist in the future.

Generalists can be tapped to handle all sorts of problems, but lack a deep expertise on any particular subject. Specialists, on the other hand, have deep knowledge in one area, but their lack of broader knowledge may hinder their career.

So, which type will dominate the future of work?

“The best approach is actually a combination of both, or a T-shaped employee skill set,” writes Morgan. “The top line of the T is a general skill set that gives an employee a broad range of understanding and capabilities, such as general marketing skills.”

Morgan goes on to say that the vertical line of the T consists of specific professional expertise.

Twitter Tweaks

Starting this week, Twitter is giving you more room to respond in your reply tweets, but you may not love how Twitter’s doing it.

According to CNN Tech, Twitter is removing the handles from reply tweets, meaning a handle will no longer count toward the 140-character limit. Instead, the handle will appear in small text above the tweet.

Critics of this move say it will make the platform more confusing to use and make it more difficult to combat trolls.

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Raegan Johnson

Raegan Johnson is a contributor to Associations Now. More »

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