Three to One: Waste Industry Groups Merge to Focus Efforts
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Three to One: Waste Industry Groups Merge to Focus Efforts

The combined group, which hasn't yet given itself an updated name, hopes to eliminate confusion and improve industry cohesion.

An number of solid-waste industry groups, currently under the umbrella of the Environmental Industry Associations (EIA),  are planning to combine into a single organization.

We are making these changes to set a strong direction for our association, establish greater value for members, and improve the industry’s image.

The groups—currently broken up into EIA, the Waste Equipment Technology Association, and the National Solid Wastes Management Association—are planning to merge in hopes of “eliminating confusion with our names and enhancing the cohesion of the sectors contributing to waste management and recycling,” the group’s CEO, Sharon Kneiss, told WasteAge.

The group will also consider a new name, which will be announced in two months at WasteExpo. More details on the merger:

Changes coming: The combined association will refocus its efforts in four ways—adding a programs department, enhancing its government affairs efforts, boosting its social media usage, and strenghening its membership recruitment and retention efforts. The group is also planning to increase resources for member needs and local chapters.

The leadership structure: The group is working on implementing transitional steps regarding its governance to ensure various industry groups are represented in a well-balanced manner. To that end, the group will have a transitional board in place for the next two years that will include players from each of the industries represented. Several committees, covering finance, membership, government affairs, and other functions, will also be formed. Member feedback regarding the efforts will be gathered over the next two months. The group hopes to have a governance structure ready by the end of 2013.

The goal: In the end, the merged association hopes to better serve its membership with a more consistent effort. “This is an exciting time for EIA,” Kneiss, who started her current position in June, told Waste Age. “The membership has been actively engaged in developing a new direction for the association. We are making these changes to set a strong direction for our association, establish greater value for members, and improve the industry’s image. We want to be the ‘voice for all things waste and recycling.’”

Ernie Smith

By Ernie Smith

Ernie Smith is the social media journalist for Associations Now, a former newspaper guy, and a man who is dangerous when armed with a good pun. MORE

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