Membership

Best Benefit Ever: Travel Discounts for Early-Career Scientists

By / Oct 21, 2014

A European science association is giving up-and-coming geochemists the chance to boost their careers with international networking.

What’s the benefit? One of the best ways for associations to appeal to industry newcomers is with the promise of career-development opportunities. And the European Association of Geochemistry takes this benefit to the next level with the lure of networking on a global scale. EAG’s Early Career Science Ambassador program gives rookie geochemists based in Europe the chance to attend conferences outside of the Continent by covering up to 50 percent of their expenses. In return, the ambassadors attend conferences as EAG representatives, which means they must display the association’s support on presentation materials and write about their experiences for the EAG blog.

Why it works for members: It’s tough for scientists to justify the costs of venturing to international conferences when they are just beginning to establish their careers and they are still financially insecure. But EAG’s program eases that burden, providing an opportunity for fledging geochemists to meet other professionals in their field, learn from industry leaders, and be exposed to new cultures. And, given that many associations struggle to entice young workers, EAG’s program provides an example of how to provide a benefit finely tuned for junior members.

Other benefits: In the spirit of helping emerging scientists establish themselves in the field, EAG also sponsors students to attend short courses, conferences, workshops, and summer schools. The association’s networking platform also provides the means for new and senior scientists to connect through a blog, monthly newsletters, job listings, and more. And if young members find themselves wooed by the world of conferences, their membership grants them discounted entrée to the Goldschmidt Conference, a premier event for geochemists.

Julia Haskins

Julia Haskins is a contributor to Associations Now. More »

Comments

Leave a Comment