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Report: Users More Comfortable With Longer Videos on Mobile

A new report from the Interactive Advertising Bureau finds that users around the world are starting to embrace watching longer videos online, along with watching more videos on their phones overall.

The general logic regarding online video—as best exemplified by the existence of six-second Vines—is that the shorter the videos for small screens, the better.

But that logic isn’t necessarily so hard and fast anymore. According to “Mobile Video 2015: A Global Perspective” [PDF], a new report from the Interactive Advertising Bureau, users are becoming more comfortable with videos that extend five minutes or longer.

The association’s study, which researched the usage patterns of mobile users in 24 different countries, suggests that in many of the surveyed countries—including the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, New Zealand, and South Africa—video watching via mobile has increased in the past year. China, Finland, and Denmark, meanwhile, have the biggest appetites for videos lasting longer than five minutes.

IAB notes that the findings leave room for marketers to experiment a little more with their digital video offerings—as long as it matches their audience’s video-watching patterns.

“Clearly, this is a real boon to global marketers that want to ensure they reach the audience segments most likely to be interested in their products or services,” Joe Laszlo, who leads the IAB Mobile Marketing Center of Excellence, explained in a news release.

The research also shows that social media channels are starting to encroach on YouTube’s popularity, with 33 percent of users finding videos through sites such as Facebook and Twitter. While a far cry from the 62 percent of users who find videos on YouTube, it nonetheless highlights quick international growth.

Interested in learning more about the new study? Read the report here [PDF], and check out its corresponding infographic below:

Ernie Smith

By Ernie Smith

Ernie Smith is a senior editor for Associations Now, a former newspaper guy, and a man who is dangerous when armed with a good pun. MORE

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