Money & Business

Louisiana Certification Bill Amended to Address Association Concerns

By / May 11, 2018 (sjlayne/iStock/Getty Images Plus)

Language that would have barred the use of professional certifications in the state was removed from the proposed Occupational Licensing Review Act after associations and their credentialed members objected to the provision.

Update, 5/18/2018: On May 17, the Louisiana House approved, 95-0, the Senate-amended version of the Occupational Licensing Review Act, which removed credentialing language that had been included in the original House bill. The measure has been sent to Gov. John Bel Edwards for signature. 

Original story: Louisiana lawmakers this week amended House Bill 748 to allow the use of professional certification credentials in the state, and the amended bill was then passed by the Louisiana Senate Commerce Committee.

Proponents of the proposed Occupational Licensing Review Act say it was intended to increase employment opportunities by loosening licensing requirements for certain jobs. But others objected to wording in the initial text that would have restricted individuals holding a voluntary certification from using the term “certified” in their title.

ASAE was part of a coalition of professional certification organizations that raised concerns with the bill’s sponsor, Rep. Julie Emerson (R), and other state lawmakers, who agreed to remove the certification provision. Many ASAE members, as well as members of the Louisiana Society of Association Executives, contacted lawmakers about the bill and registered concerns with its language.

As a result, the measure was significantly amended before the Senate Commerce Committee considered it this week. The bill now provides for the governor’s office to review 20 percent of the agencies engaged in regulatory and licensing activities within five years. The term “certification” has been removed from the bill entirely.

Although the concerns raised by ASAE and numerous other associations have been addressed, the amended bill still must be passed by the full Senate. It will then require a vote for concurrence on the House floor or be sent into conference.

Chris Vest, CAE

Chris Vest, CAE is director of public policy at ASAE. More »

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