Membership

Tuesday Buzz: Take Online Engagement Offline

By / Jul 10, 2018 (jeffbergen/E+/Getty Images Plus)

They’re already networking online, so consider how to convert online community members to chapter meeting attendees. Also: one architect’s inspiring take on the value of national meetings.

Getting members to attend local chapter meetings is usually more difficult than getting people to engage online. So, why not take advantage of your online community to get members to your real-world chapter meetings?

“Chapter leaders have the same opportunity for networking inside your online community as other members do,” writes Marjorie Anderson in a recent post for Community by Association. “The advantage they have is being able to introduce other members who are local to the area to the value of their chapter all by saying hello.”

Encourage chapter leaders to reach out to local members via your online community. Start introductory conversations, develop relationships, and extend invites to local meetings without relying on pitches or a hard sell.

Anderson also shares advice on helping chapter leaders understand how to use your community’s resources to continue conversations offline.

Conference Convert

Eric Reinholdt is an architect with more than 20 years of experience, but until recently, he’d been reluctant to attend conferences. This year, inspired by his “need to connect with others,” he attended the American Institute of Architects Conference on Architecture in New York City. It opened his eyes to what he’d been missing.

In a video he posted on LinkedIn, Reinholdt talks about the tremendous value of national meetings and why he believes conferences “should be a part of everyone’s professional diet.”

Other Links of Note

How are nonprofits taking advantage of emerging tech? Beth’s Blog dives into it.

Get to the heart of the matter. The Bloomerang blog shares tips for defining your organization’s mission, values, and vision.

Emojis are a part of modern communication, but it’s best to use them sparingly in the office. CNBC has advice on when it’s OK use emojis at work.

Raegan Johnson

Raegan Johnson is a contributor to Associations Now. More »

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