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Greeting Card Association’s New Campaign Gets Postmarked

The association’s Thinking of You Week, taking place in the U.S. for the first time later this month, will get a nod of public support in the form of a postmark on all first-class mail in September. The campaign is an extension of a hit U.K. campaign.

The U.S. Postal Service has been embracing a lot of novelty approaches in recent months, including scratch-and-sniff stamps (which proved somewhat controversial).

And its latest endeavor should put a smile on your face.

As part of a new collaboration with the Greeting Card Association, USPS will put a “Mail a Smile” postmark on all first-class mail delivered during September. The endeavor is a part of the association’s Thinking of You Week, which debuts in the U.S. market this year after a successful five-year run in the United Kingdom, put on by GCA’s British equivalent.

The campaign, which encourages people to mail one another greeting cards, takes place September 24-30 both in the U.S. and U.K., but the USPS agreed to put the postmark on all mail throughout the entire month.

“Thank you to the USPS for creating this new postmark that will remind people about the importance of making meaningful connections through cards,” GCA Executive Director Peter Doherty said in a news release.

GCA’s campaign, which got a nod of support during this year’s National Stationery Show, aims for the same kinds of smiles it hopes from the postmark, with the goal of getting people to send cards throughout the year.

“Of course, selecting, sending, and receiving greeting cards throughout the year to remember a birthday, celebrate an anniversary or just about any holiday (or no occasion at all) can bring joy to the sender and the recipient,” Doherty added in the release.

GCA is currently in growth mode, having recently announced a plan to launch its own tradeshow next year.

(malerapaso/iStock/Getty Images Plus)

Ernie Smith

By Ernie Smith

Ernie Smith is the social media journalist for Associations Now, a former newspaper guy, and a man who is dangerous when armed with a good pun. MORE

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