Money & Business

Energy Storage Group Gets Proactive on Corporate Responsibility

By / Apr 19, 2019 (tongpatong/iStock/Getty Images Plus)

The Energy Storage Association, overseeing a growing industry, has created a corporate responsibility initiative that aims to put safety out front. At least 30 companies have signed on to take part.

Some of the energy industry’s largest players are putting a focus on corporate responsibility as the field of energy storage grows.

And the Energy Storage Association, of course, is leading the way.

ESA brought together 30 companies—including General Electric’s GE Energy Storage, Panasonic, LG’s LG Chem Power, and Duke Energy—to announce their intention to take part in the Energy Storage Industry Corporate Responsibility Initiative, which the association first convened at its Annual Energy Storage Conference & Expo this week.

According to an FAQ, the pledge came to light out of concern with the sector’s fast growth. According to The 2019 U.S. Energy & Employment Report, the energy storage industry saw a nearly 18 percent increase in battery energy storage roles last year, along with a 14 percent increase in general energy storage jobs.

“The U.S. energy storage market nearly doubled in 2018 and is expected to double again in 2019, so this marks an ideal time for the industry to demonstrate their commitment to corporate responsibility,” ESA CEO Kelly Speakes-Backman said in a news release.

In the past, rapidly expanding parts of the energy industry have run into operational safety challenges caused by fast deployment of such technology. By getting companies to sign onto the initiative, ESA hopes to hold the industry to strong standards as the field evolves, and it will work with stakeholders to create standards that limit risk and optimize performance.

“We intend to work proactively to address topics head-on that could otherwise disrupt the industry’s progress,” ESA stated in the FAQ.

The industry will roll out the task force’s standards-making in three phases: first by addressing operational hazards, then tackling end-of-life and recycling needs, and finally by creating responsible practices within the field.

Ernie Smith

Ernie Smith is the social media journalist for Associations Now, a former newspaper guy, and a man who is dangerous when armed with a good pun. More »

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