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Daily Buzz: The .Org Battle Gets a Public Protest

By / Jan 23, 2020 (sleepyz/iStock/Getty Images Plus)

The controversial sale of the .org domain to a private equity firm is driving a public protest against ICANN on Friday. Also: how workplace arguments can foster growth.

A plan to sell the .org top-level domain to a private equity firm is highly controversial—and now some opponents of the sale are taking it to the streets.

SaveDotOrg, an advocacy group that counts numerous nonprofits, including ASAE, among its supporters, has organized a protest against the sale of the .org domain to Ethos Capital. On Friday, protesters will gather outside the Los Angeles offices of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN)—a global nonprofit that manages the internet’s address system.

The protest, which is open to the public, marks another step in the movement to halt the sale, in which Ethos Capital would acquire the Public Interest Registry, a nonprofit entity that has managed the .org domain registry since 2002.

Associations and other nonprofits have voiced concern about the deal, predicting that Ethos would significantly raise the price of .org registrations.

Earlier this month, a group of digital advocates with ties to ICANN offered an alternative solution, creating a co-op that they propose would manage the .org domain instead. There are approximately 10 million .org domains in operation, including most web addresses used by associations.

the benefits of Disagreement

Disagreements with coworkers might be uncomfortable, but don’t avoid them. A productive disagreement can actually have a positive impact on your output at work, says Buster Benson, author of Why Are We Yelling? The Art of Productive Disagreement, in an interview with Stephanie Vozza of Fast Company.

For one, a disagreement gives you the chance to consider other points of view.

“People have different perspectives, and their views may feel out of reach,” Benson says. “If you can’t understand how they believe what they do, ask, but be careful how you frame the question. It’s easy to slip into dehumanizing them or thinking they’re dumb.”

Other Links of Note

Making an impact. VolunteerMatch’s Erin Halley demonstrates how doing good is good for business.

Content marketing and permission-based marketing are different, writes Kivi Leroux Miller on Nonprofit Marketing Guide. She explains what sets them apart.

The Super Bowl is almost here. Event planners can learn a few things from the big game, says Sofia Wright at Smart Meetings.

Michael Hickey

Michael Hickey is a contributor to Associations Now. More »

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