Money & Business

Daily Buzz: Not Getting Much Feedback? Here’s How to Stay Confident

By / Jun 5, 2020 (PeopleImages/E+/Getty Images Plus)

Employees can stay motivated without positive reinforcement from leaders. Also: how to change jobs during the pandemic.

When employees are physically separated, feedback naturally declines. And without, say, words of encouragement from your boss after a meeting or a high-five from a colleague, employee confidence and motivation can waver.

“Reduced feedback, diminished external encouragement, and decreased interpersonal interaction don’t just take an emotional toll; they can take a toll on our work outcomes as well,” says Deborah Grayson Riegel in the Harvard Business Review.

Riegel says employees must take it upon themselves to develop their own confidence and motivation.

One way to do this is to overcome catastrophic thinking. To fill the void that zero feedback creates, some might make up stories that undermine their self-confidence. First, recognize these thoughts for what they are, then remind yourself that you have the ability to deal with even the worst-case scenario.

“List all of the inner resources you have available (your resilience, determination, sense of humor, and so on) as well as the external resources you have available (your family, your friends, your network), that you could lean into if and when you need to,” Riegel says.

And if you do want more feedback from your team, get the ball rolling by reaching out and letting them know you’re thinking about them. “When it comes to getting more positive feedback, a boost of cheerleading, or even a friendly check-in, our best bet may be to give it to get it,” Riegel says.

Switching Careers in an Uncertain Time

Changing your career path during a period of social and economic uncertainty is not easy. That’s why you need a concrete and realistic game plan to be successful.

“You may have to take on a lower-paying position or even an internship in order to gain more relevant career experience,” says Fast Company’s Diana Shi. “Focus on the training you will receive and how it might position you to land a new role. It’s fine to start small to limit your burden from risk.”

Other Links of Note

Need to plan your day more effectively? Make better to-do lists, suggests Jill Duffy on PC Mag.

Want to boost your nonprofit knowledge? Wild Apricot identifies 48 free webinars to check out in June.

If you’re thinking of making your events hybrid or virtual, ask yourself these five questions, suggests a recent post from Eventsforce.

Michael Hickey

Michael Hickey is a contributor to Associations Now. More »

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