Technology

Monday Buzz: How AARP Gets Social Right

By / Apr 27, 2015 (Vicheslav/ThinkStock)

Get an insider’s perspective into AARP’s social media successes. Plus: an early look at Windows 10’s email features.

Just because an association is huge, doesn’t mean it can’t be nimble and innovative. And just because many of its members are in their later years, doesn’t mean that they’re not keeping up with communication trends.

In a piece that originally appeared in the NTEN: Change Journal, AARP Studios Vice President Tammy Gordon pulls back the curtain and reveals some of the association’s social media inner workings.

“According to an AARP study, nearly 60 percent of our members between the ages of 50-59 have a smartphone and a whopping 76 percent of those who do are checking their social media on it,” Gordon writes, smashing stereotypes about older people’s inability to adapt to new technology.

And AARP isn’t just tackling Facebook and Twitter. It’s also reaching out via Pinterest, Instagram, YouTube, and even Vine.

AARP’s efforts are propelled not by national directors or local social media experts but by the organization’s members and audiences.

“We let our audience lead the way,” Gordon writes. “They tell us where they are interacting and what they like to share each and every day on social. We see it as our job to amplify what is working and create experiences just for them.”

Preview of the Day

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Want more out of Outlook? Then read up on some new email features in store for those upgrading to Windows 10, via this preview from CMSWire.

Other Good Reads

Feeling distracted? Focus your attention on Pressbooks founder Hugh McGuire’s interesting exploration of reading, diversion, and technology, published on Medium.

Check out some of the newest, most innovative event-planning tools by perusing Event Manager Blog‘s “10 Startups to Push Your Event Further.”

May is almost here, so carve out time next month for some of these 17 free nonprofit webinars, as curated by Wild Apricot.

Morgan Little

Morgan Little is a contributor to Associations Now. More »

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