Technology

Thursday Buzz: Digg Shutters Its RSS Reader

By / Mar 15, 2018 (Handout photo)

Another popular RSS reader bites the dust. Also: How to use Instagram to attract younger attendees to your meeting.

Today brings bad news for those of us who like curated RSS feeds.

Digg announced today that it is shutting down its RSS reader app at the end of March, reports The Next Web. For those who loved the long-lost Google Reader, this is a familiar sting.

Does the closing of Digg Reader indicate that RSS is dying? “The problem is that the number of RSS feed readers is dwindling,” said Dave Parrack in a new post for tech site MakeUseOf. “AOL Reader shut down at the beginning of the year, and more are bound to follow as RSS becomes even less popular than it is now.”

It’s safe to assume that most people these days prefer to curate their news and content outlets through Facebook news feeds and Twitter. But if you still prefer a clean RSS experience, The Next Web recommends a few readers that are still around. Feeder and Inoreader are both strong no- to low-cost options.

Attract Young Attendees

Many associations struggle to get young attendees to their meetings, and that may be in part the fault of your event promotion strategy.

The Omnipress blog says to focus on the social media platforms where young people are, such as Instagram. “Your association can create an Instagram account dedicated solely to your conference, your organization, or both,” writes Matt Larson. “Just remember, your followers like to see personality from the brands and organizations they follow, as well as eye-catching visuals with interesting captions.”

Larson goes on to make tactical recommendations for how to best use the platform to reach the younger demographics.

Other Links of Note:

Teams work best when there is a lot of trust. Here are leadership traits that inspire trust from Entrepreneur.

Looking to write better blog posts? Social Media Examiner shares a scorecard system to try.

Are you skeptical of productivity hacks? Fast Company reveals the science behind why they work.

Raegan Johnson

Raegan Johnson is a contributor to Associations Now. More »

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